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Waidangong 外丹功 Martial Art Site Map March 19, 2007

Posted by Andy Lim in Han Calisthenics, Martial Art, Waidangong, Waitankung, 外丹功, 漢導引.
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Waidangong 外丹功 Martial Art Site Map
Waidangong 外丹功 also known as Waitankung in Roman style of chinese pronunciation, is originated from China and is a kind of peaceful Chinese Qi Gong Exercise based upon the philosophy of Moralist and Chinese medicine.

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Han Calisthenics 漢導引 March 19, 2007

Posted by Andy Lim in Han Calisthenics, Martial Art, Waidangong, Waitankung, 外丹功, 漢導引.
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Han Calisthenics – 漢導引

These movements of Han calisthenics 漢導引 are based upon some ancient pictures of Han calisthenics 漢導引.

These movements of Han calisthenics 漢導引, in addition to harmonizing respiration and strengthening muscles and tendons, may also invigorate internal organs. They are good for both the young and the elderly.

Doing Han calisthenics 漢導引 before doing Waidangong 外丹功 will help activate inborn Qi inside the body.

12 Waidangong Movements 外丹功十二式 March 17, 2007

Posted by Andy Lim in Martial Art, Waidangong, Waitankung, 外丹功.
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Waidangong 外丹功 has twelve movements plus one preliminary- movement and one Qi releasing movement. These movements are divided into three sections: the first section includes the preliminary and the first four movements; the second, next four movements; the third, the last four movements and the Qi-releasing movement. In learning Waidangong 外丹功, one must first do the preliminary movement, then other movements, and finally, the Qi-releasing movement. This order must be strictly observed or there may be undesirable effects. If one does not have enough time for doing all the movements, one can first do the preliminary movement, then one or two other movements, and finally the Qi-releasing movement.

Some Do’s and Don’ts on Practicing Waidangong 外丹功

•  Consult your physician before you do Waidangong 外丹功. If your physician advises against it, please refrain from doing it.

•  Don’t do Waidangong 外丹功 right after having meals. Always do it before meals or two hours after meals when your stomach is almost empty.

•  Don’t drink ice water or cold drinks right after doing Waidangong 外丹功. This may have adverse effects on your Qi and health. But warm drinks are all right. You may have cold drinks half an hour later.

•  Don’t take a bath right after or you will lose Qi and feel tired. But you may do so in half an hour.

•  Don’t go to bed right after doing Waidangong 外丹功 or you may feel dizzy. Wait till half an hour later.

•  For ladies, don’t do Waidangong 外丹功 when you are having periods or pregnant.

12 Waidangong Movements – 外丹功十二式 功法簡介

Waidangong 外丹功 Martial Art March 13, 2007

Posted by Andy Lim in Martial Art, Waidangong, Waitankung, 外丹功.
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Introduction Of Waidangong 外丹功 Martial Art

Waidangong 外丹功 also known as Waitankung in Roman style of chinese pronunciation, is originated from China and is a kind of peaceful Chinese Qi Gong Exercise based upon the philosophy of Moralist  and Chinese medicine. 

Practised Waidangong 外丹功 to improve health and to enhance the healing of chronic disease such as high blood pressure, diabetes, heart diseases, arthritis, digestive disorders, ulcers, back pains, insomnia and so on.

A dynamic meditation practice for relaxation and stress reduction

The Metamorphosis of Mind

The Book of Metamorphosis says ” The evil turn into inferior men and the fierce turn into tigers. ” Transmigration shows that one’s mentality determines the form of one’s next life. That is why besides those mentioned above, the venomous turn into scorpions, the cunning turn into monkeys, the greedy turn into maggots, the talkative turn into cicadas, and the lazy turn into pigs. One’s mind is often shaped by one’s behavior and environment. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to cultivate one’s mind by doing good deeds and giving it a harmonious environment. Just like listening to music. If one always listens to peaceful music, then one’s mind will become calm and tranquil, thereby uplifting one’s spiritual level.

Practicing Waidangong 外丹功 is a way of cultivating one’s mind and pursuing the ultimate truth of Tao. In doing so, one has to do good deeds and behave discreetly. Waidangong 外丹功 is to activate the Qi inside one’s body and make it connected with the Qi of the outside world. In practicing Waidangong 外丹功, one has to be peaceful and free of distracting ideas before one can activate the Qi within one’s body. Once it is activated, it will flow through all parts of one’s body like electric currents and make one’s body tremble. After doing it for a certain period of time, one will gain some knowledge of the close relationship between the microcosm of the human body and the macrocosm of Nature.

The peacefulness achieved in practicing Waidangong 外丹功 will enable one to have the whole body filled with Qi. As a result, one will enjoy good health and longevity. 

On Original (Inborn) Qi

When a man reaches middle age, he stlll has more Yang than Ying (depletion of energy), but, because of having excessive desires, he tends to deplete his Yang rapidly. As a result, he contracts diseases easily. A wise man should take advantage of this Yang to practice Waidangong 外丹功 to preserve his energy and enjoy good health.

In old age, a man is as feeble as a flickering candle. At the age of sixty, he has more Ying than Yang in his body and his energy drains away day by day. If a person at this age could make use of the little Yang he still has to practice Waidangong 外丹功, he would regain his health and even youth. Likewise, a person leading a sedentary life may improve his health by learning Waidangong 外丹功.

In practicing Waidangong 外丹功, one has to count silently from one to nine, because Yang is born in one and consummated in nine. When Yang reaches nine, it returns to one again. Moving in this cycle, Yang will gradually fills the whole body with Qi (energy).

In doing the preliminary movement of Waidangong 外丹功, one should have a peaceful mind and breathe naturally so as to allow energy and blood circulate smoothly inside the body. This is similar to Buddhist meditation and Taoist ) not-doing or not-thinking. When the mind is calm and peaceful, original Qi will gradually arise from the soles and go up through the legs, the abdomen, the chest, the shoulders, the arms and finally reach the hands.

When original Qi has reached the hands, it will go out through the index fingers, which are the exits of Qi and make the hands tremble as if they were filled with electricity. The preliminary movement is the basis for doing the other movements of Waidangong 外丹功. Once the body is filled with Qi, one can go on to do other movements. Waidangong 外丹功 is also called “One Hundred Day Kung Fu,” because if a person has enough patience to practice, for about one hundred days, his complexion will become ruddy and his energy will increase. Given three hundred days, he will enjoy good health, the mentally and physically.